Post-AP Stress

It’s amazing yet hard to comprehend that my junior year in high school is nearly over. At too many points it felt too drawn out, too stressful, too unbearable. Yet, all I have is regret for it now, as the final three weeks approach quicker and quicker. I could’ve done more, I could’ve used my time more wisely. Personally, it isn’t until a school year is near-over when I realize how fast life moves, and that’s an unfortunate fact. On the flip side, this post-AP testing stress is comforting, ironically. It’s a different type of stress, not one of tests and homework but rather creating.

10636103_780627298646278_2891186710524703530_n

Photo ©2014 by Edward Fahman [CC BY 2.0]

Continue reading

Advertisements

AP Exams and Stress

With AP tests coming up, it’s hard not to be constantly worried. With how stressful and long the tests are, how can any student not be bogged down studying and stressing? Well, I for one am not actually too worried. Why, you might ask? There are a multitude of reasons, but when it comes down to it, there’s no point in me worrying about tests I already plan to study for. There’s no reason to stress over a test that I’ve already set aside time to study for. This brings me to my next topic: stress and planning.

Photo ©2011 by Eamon Curry [CC BY 2.0]

Photo ©2011 by Eamon Curry [CC BY 2.0]

As I’m sure all of us can agree, going in blind into any situation isn’t the easiest thing to do. Just as going into the wilderness without a map can be scary and dangerous, so can going into a school week without a plan. If I know I have a difficult math test coming up or anything I am nervous for, I start writing out a schedule. Not only does it give me a sort of road-map to follow that is custom-made for my schedule, but it also allows me to relax. Once I’ve realized that I have time to study and that “everything’s gonna be alright,” I can be more proactive with what I should be doing in the moment. Time and time again, it has been shown that one of the greatest fears humans have is the fear of the unknown. This is where most of our natural stress comes from. When we don’t know what we’re facing, it’s all we can think about until that moment of uncertainty passes.
Throughout my life, I’ve personally struggled to not worry so much about what the future may hold. Nowadays, though, I just think to myself the same thoughts: “I’ve been worried before, and it’s always worked out alright in the end. Just focus, plan ahead, and get the job done.” Although I still retain a little bit of that worried attitude, these thoughts do help me to focus on the now rather than the future, which is most important.

– Bryan Clements

Quiet Time

The second hand on my watch ticks constantly and I am continually in motion. Here, there, this, that, most of the time. However, it wasn’t until Thursday of last week where I realized the importance of stopping. Of letting that watch run without eyeing its continued movement. Of relieving yourself of those ticks and having some quiet time.

6113966943_0f024e230f_o

Photo ©2011 by Callum Baker [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Continue reading

College Admission

College admission has become ridiculously competitive. High school students are going to greater lengths to out-do their competition. In my parents generation it was enough just to get good grades. Now, not only do we need 4.0+ GPA’s, we need to stand out in ways that seem unnatural for most high school students.

Even if a student manages to do it all and then-some, he may not get into the school he desires. For example, my brother, last year, was ranked #1 in his senior class, was a leader in FVRR, took part in math competitions, was part of numerous clubs, volunteered many hours, started a volunteer musical performance group, had a super-high SAT score, was a National Merit Finalist and National AP Scholar, and even conducted original research at a local university. He applied to Stanford and was flat out rejected. Anyone would think, “If he didn’t get in, why should I even try?”

Photo @2010 by Sean MacEntee [CC BY 2.0]

Photo @2010 by Sean MacEntee [CC BY 2.0]

  Continue reading