Words and Actions

We’ve all heard the common expression, “actions speak louder than words.” This expression is somewhat of a guiding rule in our daily dialogue and how we should overcome problems that involve speech. Our class is beginning to read The Catcher and The Rye and we’ve decided to use a guiding question as class to use during our discussions. The question is, “Under what circumstances are words more effective than actions?” There are many circumstances, probably more than I know, and hopefully this question can be heavily discussed as we discuss and analyze the material in which we’re reading. In this blog, I will try to answer the question using real-life examples.

Photo @2013 by BK [CC BY 2.0]

Photo @2013 by BK [CC BY 2.0]

Some examples include when talking to people with higher positions in life than us. For example a student to a teacher or staff member, or an employee to a boss. If they’re discussing how one’s work ethic has been they want you to respond on why it’s been going so well or so bad. If they ask one to work harder or perform with better results, then actions might be a better way to go.

Usually using words over actions will depend on the situation. Generally, words are better when carrying out conversations and actions are better when you want results.

Knowing when to use words over actions is essential to one’s social success and how well off they are in life. I believe that if a person learns when to use actions and words they’ll have more friends and more people who like them. They will appreciate your sense of social well-being and how you treat them based on how you use your words versus actions. With job life, if you know when to use words effectively in the job place or during an interview, you’ll be able to either advance in a job or get hired.

The circumstances do matter and even though it might seem difficult deciding when to use words versus actions, it’s a great skill to have. I hope to see this question be answered better in our upcoming reading and how it applies to the book.

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